Around the industry: Activists protest to shut down campus paper for not being a 'safe space'

Bite-sized college and higher education industry news

  • Connecticut: Some students and faculty are protesting to defund the Wesleyan University's campus newspaper, arguing that the Argus is not a "safe space for the voices of students of color," unless their demands are met. The protestors' list of demands included room on the front page for minority authors and diversity training for all staff working on campus publications. During the protest, activists are also boycotting the paper. The protest was touched off by an op-ed last week in the Argus criticizing the "Black Lives Matter" movement (Thomason, Chronicle of Higher Education, 9/22).
  • Florida: Julio Frenk, the first Hispanic president of the University of Miami, officially took over the position this fall. Frenk has formerly served as the dean of the faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health, a senior fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and minister of health for Mexico. Frenk says that he plans to begin teaching again by his second year as president because he finds engagement with students so energizing (Sturdivant, Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 9/21).
  • Tennessee: Anticipating enrollment competition from Tennessee Promise, four-year institutions in the state ramped up marketing last year—and early data suggest the effort paid off. Enrollment increased at Tennessee State University and the University of Tennessee–Knoxville, according to their respective presidents. Across all Tennessee Board of Regents institutions enrollment held flat, bucking a historic trend of declining enrollment (Siner, Nashville Public Radio, 9/21).

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