Around the industry: Computer program beats national average on entrance exam

Bite-sized college and higher education industry news

  • Japan: An artificial intelligence program scored above the national average on Japan's standardized college entrance exam. The program was developed by the National Institute of Informatics with help from university and private sector researchers. The high test results earned the program an 80% chance of acceptance into 474 universities. Institute officials say they want to develop a program that scores high enough to get into the country's top-ranked school, University of Tokyo, by 2021 (Hongo, "JapanRealtime," Wall Street Journal, 11/16).
  • New Jersey: Rider University's administration and faculty union reached an agreement to prevent layoffs and 13 program cuts. A two-year wage freeze and additional concessions allow the university to avoid dropping the programs, which would have required 123 underclassmen to change majors or transfer. The institution will also offer early retirement benefits. In exchange, the faculty union will save 14 full-time positions as well as an undetermined number of adjunct jobs (Clark, NJ.com, 11/13).
  • Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University will rename two buildings honoring school presidents who facilitated the sale of 272 slaves to pay off school debt, President John DeGioia announced. Until permanent names are chosen, Mulledy Hall, named for Thomas Mulledy, will be known as Freedom Hall, and McSherry Hall, named for William McSherry, will be known as Remembrance Hall. The renaming recommendations came from a working group created by DeGioia in September (Shaver, Washington Post, 11/15; DeGioia, Georgetown University email, 11/14).

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