Examining Auxiliary Services Organizational Structures

At Medium-Sized, Public Institutions

Topics: Auxiliary Enterprises, Administration and Finance, Dining Services, Organizational Structures, Budget Models and Cost Allocations, Budgeting

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Summary

Institutions incorporate auxiliary services for flexibility and autonomy in employee management, resource allocation, and procurement. This brief outlines auxiliary services organizational structures at medium-sized, public institutions.

  • Key observations from our research:


    1. Incorporate auxiliary services for flexibility and autonomy in employee management, resource allocation, and procurement.

    2. Directors and assistant directors conduct both program management and fiscal oversight for auxiliary services.

    3. Auxiliary services departments at profiled institutions employ a director, several assistant directors, and between 80 to 3 50 full-time support staff.

    4. Jointly manage housing and dining programs to ensure capital and programmatic alignment.

    5. Parking services generates the most revenue of all auxiliary units.

    6. Form a public-private partnership to build or refurbish buildings cost effectively.