Shifting the Balance from Reactive to Preventive Maintenance

Best Practices for Eliminating Common Timesinks and Reprioritizing Critical Preventive Maintenance Tasks

Shift the balance from reactive to preventive maintenance with 11 executive-level best practices to improve the allocation of limited staff, data, and financial resources for preventive tasks.

Shifting the Balance from Reactive to Preventive Maintenance

While colleges and universities have faced maintenance challenges for decades, recent trends have combined to elevate maintenance to a strategic imperative for senior leaders. Beyond tighter budgets and widening funding gaps, most institutions face the dual challenge of replacing or renovating aging buildings while maintaining newer “smart” buildings that require more frequent and complex upgrades.

Most significantly, the relationship among deferred, reactive, and preventive maintenance (PM) creates a multifaceted problem. As deferred maintenance backlogs grow and building systems begin to fail, facilities must divert resources to reactive maintenance activities, which in turn leaves fewer resources for preventive maintenance.

Fortunately, preventive maintenance offers a clear and compelling return on investment. One organization found that for every $1 invested in PM, institutions save $2.73 in future reactive needs. To help facilities leaders shift the balance from reactive to preventive maintenance, this report provides 11 executive-level best practices to improve the allocation of limited staff, data, and financial resources for preventive tasks.

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